Postgraduate taught 

Comparative Literature MLitt

An Introduction to Comparative Literature COMPLIT5030

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Modern Languages and Cultures
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

A PG-level introduction to the theory of Comparative Literature, this course is one of two which will be available to students in any literature-culture PGT programme in the College of Arts. This course will provide the historical and theoretical background to the study of Comparative Literature and can be seen as preparation for further study on any optional Comparative Literature courses, including Comparative Literature in Practice in Semester 2.

Timetable

Weekly 2-hour seminar for 11 weeks.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

Assessment for the core consists of the following:

■ Individual reflective study diary (1,000 words) (10%)

■ 20-minute individual conference-type presentation (end of Semester 1) to be developed into the essay (20%)

■ 3,500 word essay plus 500 word reflective appendix to be submitted at the end of week 2 of Semester 2 (70%).

 

Reassessment

In accordance with the University's Code of Assessment reassessments are normally set for all courses which do not contribute to the honours classifications. For non honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students, and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions are listed below in this box.

 

The essay may be resubmitted (as a newly-written piece) at the end of Semester 2.

NEITHER the presentations NOR the reflective diary may be reassessed.

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? No

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

The aims of this course are to:

 

■ provide a solid theoretical background in the discipline of Comparative Literature, harking back to the origins of literary study and aesthetics in Classical times and focusing largely on the developments of the 20th and 21st centuries;

 

■ introduce and discuss key terms and concepts including: World Literature, Global Literature, Reception Studies, Intermedial Studies, Translation Studies, Cultural Studies, Intercultural Studies, Post-Colonial Studies, Literary Theory and Literary History.

 

The Course will provide a largely theoretical background which is meanT to complement the more primary-text-based Course (Comparative Literature in Practice) to follow in semester 2.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

Intended learning outcomes:

By the end of the course students will be able to:

■ Articulate in oral and written form their own cultural position vis-à-vis different texts encountered during the course;

■ Demonstrate an understanding of the general history of the study of literature, and in particular of the rise of the discipline of Comparative Literature and related disciplinary areas as outlined above;

■ Explain the process of comparison in comparative literatures and cultures;

■ Demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the significance of languages and translation in the study of any text;

■ Assess and show the significance of ideology in engaging with texts from other cultures, and from one's own culture;

■ Demonstrate a deeper grasp of the issues and problems involved in working with comparative literature, and present these critically.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.