Postgraduate taught 

Comparative Literature MLitt

Theories Of Reading COMPLIT4003

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Modern Languages and Cultures
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The primary purpose of this course is to make students aware that how to read is often as important as what is read. The course introduces students to various ways of thinking about the reading process in comparative literature, exemplified by text-oriented, context-oriented and reader-oriented theories.

Timetable

2x1hr seminar per week, Tuesday at 1pm and Friday at 11am over 10 weeks as scheduled on MyCampus.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Commentary (1000 words) - 30%

Essay (3000 words) - 70%

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable for Honours courses

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

This course aims to:

■ introduce students to various ways of thinking about the reading process in comparative literature, exemplified by text-oriented, context-oriented and reader-oriented theories.;

■ make students aware that how to read is often as important as what is read;

■ explore the significance of selected theories in terms of their contribution to the development of modern critical discourse, and specifically to the field of comparative literature;

■ emphasize the importance of literary and philosophical ways of operating upon texts (including films) offered by selected thinkers and schools of thought;

■ illustrate and discuss various examples of critical literary approaches, with a particular focus on their application to the field of comparative literature.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course students will be able to:

■ describe the major theoretical schools and movements discussed;

■ assess the significance of selected theories in terms of their contribution to the development of modern critical discourse and the field of comparative literature;

■ evaluate which are the appropriate methodologies to offer the most effective analytical tools for specific purposes, and thus select/compile the most suitable "method" for their own reading tasks in relation to film and literature;

■ describe the issues and problems that are involved in theorising reading in the context of comparative literature.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.